windbag

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windbag

the bag in a set of bagpipes, which provides a continuous flow of air to the pipes
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Calling a political opponent, or someone with whom you have contrary views a "windbag" is one thing; to add the term "Welsh" to it, is another.
Asked if the drivers were "windbags" - a term used to describe a person who speaks at length, but says little of any value - Ecclestone replied: "Some of them".
Windbags who protest about Tory leader Mike Whitby's axe will do backroom deals and leave their posts quietly under early retirement or voluntary redundancy packages, paid for by you, me and Mrs Tyndale.
The three stories in this first instalment: How To Blow Up Tollins, Sparkler And The Purple Death and Windbags And Dark Tollins, provide the definitive guide to these remarkable flying creatures.
And Murphy reckons one section above all others will be of interest to his cabinet colleagues, especially those windbags known to prattle on without saying anything.
Others may seem them as pompous windbags with over-inflated egos and obscene salaries to match.
It takes the air out of the pompous windbags of the right.
Along the way, they assess the pros and cons of various styles of meetings, as well as explore critical issues such as decision-making, drawing out reluctant participants, dealing with windbags or autocrats and much more.
One they we you I will suffer no windbags no gods or goddesses in your
Indeed, it is a toss-up who we are supposed to dislike least: the fanatical terrorists dreaming of their heavenly reward of 72 black-eyed virgins, or the pompous, career-obsessed windbags ranged against them.
During this somber season of atonement, assorted windbags take to the airwaves to decry the callous incompetence of American teachers and to label our students as fat, lazy and stupid.
In The Closing of the American Mind (1987) Allan Bloom attacked the "spiritual detumescence" of the Academy populated by students and professors enslaved to sex and drugs and rock 'n' roll; Roger Kimball took on the "tenured radicals" while Hilton Kramer punctured public intellectuals, and between them this redoubtable duo tilted at the winds of change with such regularity that despite their healthy provocation they were in danger of sounding like windbags of woe.