winds aloft

winds aloft

[′winz ə′lȯft]
(meteorology)
Generally, the wind speeds and directions at various levels in the atmosphere above the domain of surface weather observations, as determined by any method of winds-aloft observation. Also known as upper-level winds; upper winds.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is an old joke that the winds aloft forecast is the only weather a cargo pilot looks at to calculate fuel because it doesn't matter what the other weather is, you're still going.
Strong winds aloft cause an intense lee-side low to form, typically in eastern Colorado but sometimes further north or south.
But, you could do a semi-portable installation (the Mobile Link network has a 98-foot reception range) and for those who fly with a PC, the WxWorx on Wings software is full-featured with decent radar graphics, winds aloft data, echo tops and lightning data, to name a few features.
Throughout the course of that evening, embassy staff oversaw the 35-member Polish military band, the Air Force Winds Aloft band, 57 event sponsors, dozens of logistical support staff, four media outlets and more than 1,800 guests, including Polish government officials and pop culture celebrities.
A warm, humid air mass, a stationary frontal boundary, and rather weak winds aloft set the stage for the slow-moving storms.
But this day found stiff winds aloft blowing in from the Baltic, east to west across Northern Germany toward the Atlantic.
During this night sortie, the weather was mostly clear with some haze at medium altitudes and high winds aloft.
He added: "The whole health of this industry is closely aligned to GDP growth and there are certain winds aloft that could affect that growth.
ADS-B traffic and weather display on the GMX 200 and MX 20 MFDs, providing these customers with select ADS-B In benefits, including NEXRAD, as well as textual weather products such as METARs, TAFs, PIREPs and winds aloft.
Great Plains during summer stems from a shift toward locally weakened westerly winds aloft and somewhat stronger northerly winds.
This combined with strong favorable winds aloft will result in a risk of few strong tornadoes, very large hail and damaging winds in the most intense storms.
The study, however, suggested the weakening of the winds aloft has enabled the formation of stronger cyclones in recent years - including storms in 2007 and 2010 that were the first recorded storms ever to enter the Gulf of Oman.