Wineskin

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Wineskin

 

a leather pouch made from the whole skin of an animal (such as a goat or horse), used to store wine, koumiss, and so forth. Wineskins are widespread in the countries of the East and among some peoples of Middle Asia and Siberia.

References in periodicals archive ?
What will the owner do - ruin the wineskins or forget his good intentions?
Mcpherson tell us he still has a few bottles of the 2007 Merlot wineskin vintage, and is willing to share with readers.
such as the reference to rough weather in the episode of Pamphile's reading of the lamp (2,11), and the gusty wind during Lucius' encounter with the wineskins (2,32).
But there's no doubt these modern packaging methods come into their own in the fridge door, or al fresco, or for a refreshing glug while herding the sheep in the mountains of Greece - those wineskins are so last year
But, if Abrams showed us how the Romantic poets decanted the disappointments of their political hopes into the new wineskins of an implicitly religious, though secular, redemption through nature and art, Barrell forces us, allows us, to see that the vectors of imagination at the time were by no means drawn through poetry alone, but, on the contrary, charted the arc of some of the most public, political crises and controversies going.
The fact that cannon balls, gunpowder canisters, wineskins and metal buckles were found, attest to the fact that this ship was part of a naval fleet.
13) Common to different schools of thought is an acknowledgment that the old wineskins are no longer holding the new wine of the Gospel and that new wineskins are required.
George Pati, Boston University, "New Wineskins, Old Wine: Tradition versus Modernity in Colonial Kerala, South India"
Indeed, Quint could have filled the trunk with other and more problematic genres, for the episode of the wineskins recalls not only a chivalric romance but also Apuleius' Golden Ass.
Much of the rest of the text provocatively interprets some of the best-known events from the novel: Don Quixote jousting with windmills, battling sheep, stabbing wineskins, and encountering galley slaves.