wing drop

wing drop

[′wiŋ ‚dräp]
(aerospace engineering)
A phenomenon experienced by an air vehicle during maneuvers at moderate to high angles of attack, in which an abrupt reduction of lift from one side of the vehicle prior to the other side creates a rolling moment, which causes loss of control of the airplane's roll attitude.

wing drop

A tendency of an aircraft to roll to one of its sides (wind dropping to that side) when the aircraft approaches the stalling angle. This should not be confused with the term wing heavy, which is the tendency of a wing to drop at normal operating speeds.
References in periodicals archive ?
There's buffeting, but no dramatic wing drop. We were able to get it to break to one side during an aggressive pull, but relaxing the stick immediately got the wings flying again.
The aircraft experienced a sharp right wing drop, followed by a hard swerve to the right.
Lockheed Martin is developing a spoiler for F-35C Joint Strike Fighter flight test aircraft to counter potential wing drop in transonic turns.
Stall speed in the clean configuration and at gross weight is 45 knots (41 knots dirty) and there's plenty of warning before the stall, without much in the way of wing drop. The large bubble canopy provides plenty of visibility and makes the cabin easy to ingress and egress.
There was a slight amount of right wing drop during power-on stalls (it was a gusty day when we flew the aircraft), but recovery was quick and easy by getting the nose down and neutralizing the controls.
The SAM exhibited no bad habits in a stall, with a noticeable buffeting followed by a drop of the nose, and no wing drop. The aircraft quickly flies out of the stall when you pitch it down.
When the accident airplane was about 150 feet agl, he saw the right wing drop with the pilot simultaneously keying the mike and saying "Whoa." The airplane's nose continued to drop, and the airplane impacted the ground in a nose-low, near-vertical attitude.
In essence, his article is about countering a wing drop if it occurs at the point of stall.
Remember the momentary left wing drop? The pilot tried to correct it with right aileron.
During the landing rollout, both pilots felt the right wing drop and heard a noise like "a blown tire." They attempted to maintain directional control of the airplane, but the right wing dropped further and the airplane veered off the right side of the runway.