winged disk

winged disk

In Egyptian Revival architecture, same as sun disk.
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The Egyptians added into the sky the winged disk of the sun flying across the vault, a motif that later became a vulture or an eagle.
Apollo is, of course, the successor to the Egyptian winged disk of the sun and the Roman eagle, and is clearly meant to allude to Louis XIV--the self-styled Sun King.
In regard to the winged disk, it appears that Galdos drew at least two early versions.
Ornan's analysis of the oft-explored "winged disk," Cecchini's of the "suivant du char royal," and Faegersten's exploration of the Phoenician source material for a group of kilted male votive statues from sixth-century Cyprus are insightful case studies, since they bring objects from many different media, sites, and time periods into their discussions.
Firstly, Irene Winter has convincingly demonstrated that the famous relief showing the king flanking the Tree under the winged disk corresponds to the epithet "vice-regent of Assur" in the accompanying inscription.
Now reading that, you might assume that he was relying on Winter's authority that the Tree represents the "divine world order," but in fact, in her article Winter said rather that the Tree represents fertility, and that the "divine principles" are represented by Ashur in the winged disk. [15] So the symbolic or functional similarity of the Assyrian and Sefirotic Trees rests solely on Parpola's assertions.
"This strongly suggests that this important god has to be identified with the winged disk over the Assyrian Tree ...
(10.) In the palace reliefs of Assurnasirpal II the winged disk and the two figures of the king in the scene below the tree in fig.
In 1937 Hetty Goldman published a bulla found at Tarsus bearing the impression of a royal seal.(1) It shows the name of the queen under the winged disk, between antithetic signs for "Great Queen," written with the four hieroglyphs pu-tu-ha-pa, as Gelb found by comparison with the rock inscription of Fraktin.