wink

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wink

1
an interrupted flashing of light

wink

2
a disc used in the game of tiddlywinks
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

wink

(1) See Wink hub.

(2) A short control signal in telephony operations. It can be a single pulse, a brief interruption of a continuous tone, a change of bits or a change in polarity of the signal. For example, a momentary interruption (the wink) of a continuous, single-frequency tone is a signal that the receiving device is ready. The momentary interruption (the wink) of current to the light next to a telephone's hold button causes it to flicker as a signal to the user that the line is on hold.
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References in classic literature ?
It was Winks who summed up the general impression and put it into a form they all felt conclusively damning.
But, while returning among those lanes of light, Durdles becomes so very uncertain, both of foot and speech, that he half drops, half throws himself down, by one of the heavy pillars, scarcely less heavy than itself, and indistinctly appeals to his companion for forty winks of a second each.
And you've had your forty winks. So you really must get off to bed, old man!
He cocked his head to one side, shut one eye and put the other one to the hole, like a possum looking down a jug; then he glanced up with his bright eyes, gave a wink or two with his wings--which signifies gratification, you understand--and says, 'It looks like a hole, it's located like a hole--blamed if I don't believe it IS a hole!'
Wid that I giv'd her a big wink jist to say, "lit Sir Pathrick alone for the likes o' them thricks," and thin I wint aisy to work, and you'd have died wid the divarsion to behould how cliverly I slipped my right arm betwane the back o' the sofy, and the back of her leddyship, and there, sure enough, I found a swate little flipper all a waiting to say, "the tip o' the mornin' to ye, Sir Pathrick O'Grandison, Barronitt." And wasn't it mesilf, sure, that jist giv'd it the laste little bit of a squaze in the world, all in the way of a commincement, and not to be too rough wid her leddyship?
Petritsky, still humming, winked and made a pout with his lips, as though he would say: "Oh, yes, we know your Bryansky."
But the Reindeer begged so hard for little Gerda, and Gerda looked so imploringly with tearful eyes at the Finland woman, that she winked, and drew the Reindeer aside into a corner, where they whispered together, while the animal got some fresh ice put on his head.
Baggs forgot her nerves and winked. I returned the wink and filled the glass a second time.
He winked--winked openly and undisguisedly; winked with his right eye--upon Henrietta Lillyvick!
Mary even thought she saw him wink his eyes as if to wink tears away.
While Dorothy was looking earnestly into the queer, painted face of the Scarecrow, she was surprised to see one of the eyes slowly wink at her.
He winked at the butler, whispered directions to the footmen, and awaited each expected dish with some anxiety.