wren

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Related to winter wren: house wren

wren,

small, plump perching songbird of the family Troglodytidae. There are about 60 wren species, and all except one are restricted to the New World. The plumage is usually brown or reddish above and white, gray, or buff, often streaked, below. Wrens are similar to sparrows but have longer, slender bills and usually perch with their tails cocked straight up. They are valuable insect destroyers. Among the best singers are the canyon, Carolina, and winter wrens. Most wrens nest in natural holes and cavities; house wrens, which range over most of the United States and S Canada, will nest in boxes built for them and in crannies about dwellings. Also found in North America are the cactus, rock, and marsh wrens. The common European wren is a winter wren. Wrens are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Passeriformes.

Wren

 

(Troglodytes troglodytes), a bird of the family Troglodytidae of the order Passeriformes. The body length measures 10−12 cm long; the bird weighs 8–11 g. The plumage is grayish brown.

The wren is distributed in Europe, North Africa, Asia, and North America. In the USSR it is found from the western borders to the Kuril Islands (except Western and Central Siberia). In the northern part of its area of distribution it is a migratory bird, while in the south it is not. The wren stays in coniferous and leafy forests in dense underbrush. In the mountains of Middle Asia and on the Komandorskie and Kuril islands it is found on cliffs and in sparse thickets. The nest is globular, with a side entrance. The clutch contains six or seven eggs, which are white with reddish spots. The wren incubates the eggs 14–15 days. It feeds primarily on spiders and small insects; it also eats seeds and berries.

wren

[ren]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of the various small brown singing birds in the family Troglodytidae; they are insectivorous and tend to inhabit dense, low vegetation.

wren

1. any small brown passerine songbird of the chiefly American family Troglodytidae, esp Troglodytes troglodytes (wren in Britain, winter wren in the US and Canada). They have a slender bill and feed on insects
2. any of various similar birds of the families Muscicapidae (Australian warblers), Xenicidae (New Zealand wrens), etc.

Wren

Sir Christopher. 1632--1723, English architect. He designed St Paul's Cathedral and over 50 other London churches after the Great Fire as well as many secular buildings
References in periodicals archive ?
Together, they help Tom's life fade to a resolution as pure as the song of the winter wren.
Specifically, of the 15 species associated with late-seral forest considered in this study, (see Results: Bird-habitat relationships), 3 (Winter Wren, Varied Thrush, and Chestnut-backed Chickadee; see Table 1 for scientific names) had sufficient ([is greater than] 30) detections in each landscape to compute a separate effective detection distance for each landscape and 3 (Evening Grosbeak, Brown Creeper, and Hammond's Flycatcher) required that we pool the detections across replicate landscapes in each landscape structural category (Fig.
All of these species, however, were detected in two or more seral conditions, and some (e.g., Winter Wren) were relatively common in younger seral conditions, even though they demonstrated exclusive statistical selection for late-seral conditions.
Like salmon, our children's gift will be to bring their gathered riches back to a land made poor by taking, and plant them among the winter wrens and newly greening trees.
I was shocked to hear the Winter Wren turn into a Northern Mockingbird!
The result is a true hybrid, as if the brain of a winter wren had been transplanted inside a wildly gifted human singer.
They have cut small patches to create deer browse, left brushy coverts for grouse and woodcock, encouraged beech and oak stands to increase food supply for bears, and left large stretches of maturing forest for more reclusive species like bears, thrush, and winter wrens.
But ''good'' birds included 4 white-winged crossbills, 2 red crossbills, an evening grosbeak, a fox sparrow, 8 winter wrens, a merlin, 7 pileated woodpeckers, 2 saw-whet owls and 2 red-shouldered hawks.
Birds that nest in tree tops such as scarlet tanagers face a reduced habitat; cavity-dwellers such as winter wrens and hermit thrushes that nest close to the ground will thrive in the jumble of fallen and broken trees.
As the dead trees start to decay, he also expects an increase in cavity-nesting birds including winter wrens, black-capped chickadees, great-crested flycatcher, bluebirds, woodpeckers and various owls.
The hunting red-tailed hawk will scream his drawn-out "keeeer!" while migrating geese honk overhead, drowning out a small, disorganized chorus of white-throated sparrows, chickadees, jays, titmice, hermit thrushes, winter wrens and nuthatches foraging for breakfast.
Among some of the significant birds seen in various spots, Buelow said, are "snow buntings and horned larks, swamps for eastern bluebirds, northern flickers and winter wrens, and back roads in the predawn for saw-whet owls."