wren

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wren,

small, plump perching songbird of the family Troglodytidae. There are about 60 wren species, and all except one are restricted to the New World. The plumage is usually brown or reddish above and white, gray, or buff, often streaked, below. Wrens are similar to sparrows but have longer, slender bills and usually perch with their tails cocked straight up. They are valuable insect destroyers. Among the best singers are the canyon, Carolina, and winter wrens. Most wrens nest in natural holes and cavities; house wrens, which range over most of the United States and S Canada, will nest in boxes built for them and in crannies about dwellings. Also found in North America are the cactus, rock, and marsh wrens. The common European wren is a winter wren. Wrens are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Passeriformes.

Wren

 

(Troglodytes troglodytes), a bird of the family Troglodytidae of the order Passeriformes. The body length measures 10−12 cm long; the bird weighs 8–11 g. The plumage is grayish brown.

The wren is distributed in Europe, North Africa, Asia, and North America. In the USSR it is found from the western borders to the Kuril Islands (except Western and Central Siberia). In the northern part of its area of distribution it is a migratory bird, while in the south it is not. The wren stays in coniferous and leafy forests in dense underbrush. In the mountains of Middle Asia and on the Komandorskie and Kuril islands it is found on cliffs and in sparse thickets. The nest is globular, with a side entrance. The clutch contains six or seven eggs, which are white with reddish spots. The wren incubates the eggs 14–15 days. It feeds primarily on spiders and small insects; it also eats seeds and berries.

wren

[ren]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of the various small brown singing birds in the family Troglodytidae; they are insectivorous and tend to inhabit dense, low vegetation.

wren

1. any small brown passerine songbird of the chiefly American family Troglodytidae, esp Troglodytes troglodytes (wren in Britain, winter wren in the US and Canada). They have a slender bill and feed on insects
2. any of various similar birds of the families Muscicapidae (Australian warblers), Xenicidae (New Zealand wrens), etc.

Wren

Sir Christopher. 1632--1723, English architect. He designed St Paul's Cathedral and over 50 other London churches after the Great Fire as well as many secular buildings
References in periodicals archive ?
Reestablishment of an insular Winter Wren population following a severe freeze.
Bald eagles, black bears, river otters, mink, even the diminutive winter wren and deer mouse share in this seasonal banquet that will help see them through the critical months of winter.
Those species that commonly breed in cooler, more northerly, mainly coniferous forests, such as Blue-headed Vireo, Winter Wren, Magnolia Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, Blackburnian Warbler, Canada Warbler, Dark-eyed Junco, and Purple Finch, were found in pine plantations, mixed pine-deciduous woods, and the hemlock-deciduous forests in the gorges and ravines of the Pierson Creek and Stebbins Run watersheds.
Specifically, of the 15 species associated with late-seral forest considered in this study, (see Results: Bird-habitat relationships), 3 (Winter Wren, Varied Thrush, and Chestnut-backed Chickadee; see Table 1 for scientific names) had sufficient ([is greater than] 30) detections in each landscape to compute a separate effective detection distance for each landscape and 3 (Evening Grosbeak, Brown Creeper, and Hammond's Flycatcher) required that we pool the detections across replicate landscapes in each landscape structural category (Fig.
All of these species, however, were detected in two or more seral conditions, and some (e.g., Winter Wren) were relatively common in younger seral conditions, even though they demonstrated exclusive statistical selection for late-seral conditions.
Based on the ANOVA, 5 species (Gray Jay, Brown Creeper, Winter Wren, Varied Thrush, and Chestnut-backed Chickadee) were strongly affected by changes in habitat area (P[greater than or equal to]0.007), 5 species (Evening Grosbeak, Hammond's Flycatcher, Pileated Woodpeecker, Western Wood-Pewee, and Red-breasted Nuthatch) were moderately affected (0.011 [greater than or equal to] P [greater than or equal to] 0.092), and 5 species (Red Crossbill, Red-breasted Sapsucker, Western Tanager, Olive-sided Flycatcher, and Red-tailed Hawk) were virtually unaffected (P[less than or equal to]0.212).