winter

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winter

1. 
a. the coldest season of the year, between autumn and spring, astronomically from the December solstice to the March equinox in the N hemisphere and at the opposite time of year in the S hemisphere
b. (as modifier): winter pasture
2. the period of cold weather associated with the winter
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

What does it mean when you dream about winter?

A winter dreamscape could indicate the dreamer’s favorite time of the year for fun and frolic. However, winter is also a season in which many people experience depression. This dream could indicate an emotional withdrawal from a personal relationship or a withdrawing of one’s emotional investment in the workplace.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

winter

[′win·tər]
(astronomy)
The period from the winter solstice, about December 22, to the vernal equinox, about March 21; popularly and for most meteorological purposes, winter is taken to include December, January, and February in the Northern Hemisphere, and June, July, and August in the Southern Hemisphere.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

first point of Capricornus

first point of Capricornusclick for a larger image
That point on the ecliptic occupied by the sun at the maximum southerly declination. Sometimes called the December solstice, the first point of Capricornus. The same as the winter solstice, the first point of Libra. The point of the intersection of the ecliptic and the celestial equator (equinoctial). When the sun is moving from the north to the south direction. It is denoted by the symbol image. Also called the winter, or December, equinox.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

Maidyarem (Maidhyairya; Mid-Year or Winter Feast)

December-January, May, June; 16th-20th days of Dae, the 10th Zoroastrian month
Maidyarem is the fifth of the six great seasonal feasts, known as gahambars, of the Zoroastrian religion. It was traditionally celebrated at a point in the agricultural year when, due to extreme cold, all work came to a halt. The name comes from the word airya, which means "rest."
The six gahambars were typically joyous festivals that included such activities as special rituals and prayers, and the sharing of food. Although they lasted five days, the fifth day was the only one spent in actual celebration; the other four were for preparation and anticipation of the day's feasting, when families or neighborhoods would get together. These seasonal feasts were designed to give those who worked from dawn to dusk on farms a respite from their labors. Today, with so many Zoroastrians living in urban areas, the importance of the gahambars has diminished.
The Zoroastrian calendar has 12 months of 30 days each, plus five extra days at the end of the year. Because of discrepancies in the calendars used by widely separated Zoroastrian communities around the world, there are now three different calendars in use, and Maidyarem can fall either in December-January, May, or June according to the Gregorian calendar.
There are only about 100,000 followers of Zoroastrianism today, and most of them live in northwestern India or Iran. Smaller communities exist in Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Canada, the U.S., England, and Australia.
SOURCES:
RelHolCal-2004, p. 69
Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations of the World Dictionary, Fourth Edition. © 2010 by Omnigraphics, Inc.

Winter

Boreas
the north wind; associated with winter. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 130]
crane
pictorial emblem in Buddhist tradition. [Animal Symbol-ism: Jobes, 378]
Ded Moroz
personification of winter; “Grandfather Frost.” [Russ. Folklore: Misc.]
goat
zodiacally belongs to December; hence, winter. [Astrology: Hall, 139]
Hiems
personification; portrayed as old and decrepit. [Rom. Myth.: LLEI, I: 322]
Jack Frost
personification of winter. [Pop. Culture: Misc.]
Old Man Winter
personification of winter. [Pop. Culture: Misc.]
old man wrapped in cloak
personification of winter. [Art: Hall, 130]
Persephone
the period of her stay (winter) with Hades. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 28]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
He knew there was only one thing to say to Hal Winters, son of old Windpeter Winters, only one thing that all his own training and all the beliefs of the people he knew would approve, but for his life he couldn't say what he knew he should say.
When he came to the fence at the edge of the road and confronted Hal Winters, all dressed up and smoking a pipe as he walked jauntily along, he could not have told what he thought or what he wanted.
There were scores of pitch pines around my house, from one to four inches in diameter, which had been gnawed by mice the previous winter -- a Norwegian winter for them, for the snow lay long and deep, and they were obliged to mix a large proportion of pine bark with their other diet.
"Lord de Winter!" exclaimed the queen, "the friend of my husband.
no, madame," answered De Winter; "but the case is provided for and I am come to France to seek allies."
"Madame," replied De Winter, "provided I can find some of my good old friends of former times I will answer for anything."
Lord de Winter, on quitting D'Artagnan, gave him his sister's address.
Lord de Winter arrived at the appointed time; but Athos, being warned of his coming, went into the other chamber.
"You see," said Lord de Winter, presenting D'Artagnan to his sister, "a young gentleman who has held my life in his hands, and who has not abused his advantage, although we have been twice enemies, although it was I who insulted him, and although I am an Englishman.
She spoke some words to Lord de Winter in English, who thereupon requested D'Artagnan's permission to retire, excusing himself on account of the urgency of the business that had called him away, and charging his sister to obtain his pardon.
D'Artagnan exchanged a shake of the hand with Lord de Winter, and then returned to Milady.
She told D'Artagnan that Lord de Winter was her brother-in-law, and not her brother.