wire drag

wire drag

[′wīr ′drag]
(engineering)
An apparatus for surveying rocky underwater areas where normal sounding methods are insufficient to ensure the discovery of all existing submerged obstructions, small shoals, or rocks above a given depth or for determining the least depth of an area; it consists essentially of a buoyed wire towed at the desired depth by two launches.
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(Photos courtesy of the Library of Congress, LC-DIGppmsca-40717 and LC-USZ62-110551.) Next page, top: A diver descends from a survey power boat to confirm the location of an obstruction located by a wire drag. Next page, bottom: A common wire drag used by survey vessels to identify underwater obstructions in the lakes.
During WW1 the British achieved bracing wire drag reduction by developing streamlined wire cross sections, but the Germans achieved further drag reductions by using cantilever wing structure with much fewer bracing wires.
* AgiePilot wire-path control system that compensates for "wire drag" to allow high-speed cutting in curves and corners with no loss of accuracy.