wire drag

wire drag

[′wīr ′drag]
(engineering)
An apparatus for surveying rocky underwater areas where normal sounding methods are insufficient to ensure the discovery of all existing submerged obstructions, small shoals, or rocks above a given depth or for determining the least depth of an area; it consists essentially of a buoyed wire towed at the desired depth by two launches.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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(Photos courtesy of the Library of Congress, LC-DIGppmsca-40717 and LC-USZ62-110551.) Next page, top: A diver descends from a survey power boat to confirm the location of an obstruction located by a wire drag. Next page, bottom: A common wire drag used by survey vessels to identify underwater obstructions in the lakes.
* AgiePilot wire-path control system that compensates for "wire drag" to allow high-speed cutting in curves and corners with no loss of accuracy.