wiretapping

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wiretapping

A form of eavesdropping involving physical connection to the communications channels to breach the confidentiality of communications. For example, many poorly-secured buildings have unprotected telephone wiring closets where intruders may connect unauthorized wires to listen in on phone conversations and data communications. See ECPA.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the Justice Department clarified that it and the FBI "do not confirm or deny the existence" of any other records that are responsive to the group's request, which was broader than the alleged wiretaps of Trump Tower.
html) insisted Monday  there were numerous reports from a "variety of outlets over the last couple months that seemed to indicate that there has been some kind of surveillance that occurred during the 2016 election," but at the same time softening Trump's allegation by explaining Trump didn't think Obama installed the alleged wiretaps personally.
Ning Cai and Haowei Yang first proposed a communication system on a wiretap network(CSWN) and proved a necessary condition of implementing network security by network coding, meaning that source node sends message to destination node without leaking out any useful information to wiretapper [1].
As part of its investigation, the government sought wiretaps on various cell phones.
The vacancy opened after the disciplinary dismissal of Nikolay Kokinov by the Supreme Judicial Council (VSS) due to a scandalous wiretap leak.
All user activities such as creation of legal wiretaps and machine activities are controlled and logged.
The Rajaratnam case could easily herald the broader use of white-collar wiretaps, and not just in the insider trading arena.
The move to muzzle comes despite the Italian judiciary's use of wiretaps to fight crime, especially anti-Mafia operations.
Two FISA provisions, born in the USA PATRIOT Act and dealing with roving wiretaps (section 206) and business records (section 215), are scheduled to expire on December 31, 2009.
According to Wired News reporter Ryan Singel, "The FBI has quietly built a sophisticated, point-and-click surveillance system that performs instant wiretaps on almost any communications device, according to nearly a thousand pages of restricted documents newly released under the Freedom of information Act.
Senator Bingaman's position is that the Senate should take a more active role in investigating the President's approving of wiretaps before we get to censure," spokesperson Maria Najera explained.