endive

(redirected from witloof)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

endive:

see chicorychicory
or succory
, Mediterannean herb (Cichorium intybus) of the family Asteraceae (aster family), naturalized in North America, where the tall stalks of usually blue flowers are common along waysides and are known as blue-sailors.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

endive

a plant, Cichorium endivia, cultivated for its crisp curly leaves, which are used in salads: family Asteraceae (composites)
References in periodicals archive ?
The rules have been relaxed on 26 fruit and veg - apricots, artichokes, asparagus, aubergines, avocados, beans, brussels sprouts, cauliflowers, cherries, courgettes, cucumbers, cultivated mushrooms, garlic, hazelnuts in shells, headed cabbage, leeks, melons, onions, peas, plums, ribbed celery, spinach, walnuts in shell, watermelons, witloof chicory.
Consider EU "Regulation (EEC) No 2213/83 of 28 July 1983 laying down quality standards for onions and witloof chicory." You would think that the 10 pages of standards and the 19 amendments and corrections made in the 25 years since the regulation's enactment would leave little doubt about the required size, shape and color of an onion, and the amount of peeling, bruising, staining, cracking, root tufting and sprouting that is permissible.
The witloof (white leaf), or Belgian chicory, is grown for forcing in autumn for winter eating.
I'll certainly be sowing the 1977 Custard Pie marrow, the Hollow Crown parsnip (20p a packet in 1980) and the Witloof chicory you paid 33p for in 1984.
There are three types of chicory ( Witloof, red chicory (also known as radicchio) and sugarloaf chicory.
The chicory family is complicated and numerous: the French call chicory endive or witloof; we call their curly chicory endive or frissee; then there are the red chicory, trevise and the compact radicchio.
Witloof chicory, which is also called Belgium endive, is a market class of chicory that is harvested in the fall, stored at freezing temperatures, and grown in the dark to produce chicons, and used in salads (Corey and Whitney, 1987).
In parts of Europe, witloof chicory is a widespread and accepted provender.