wizardly


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wizardly

Pertaining to wizards. A wizardly feature is one that only a wizard could understand or use properly.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
Dead moms, stolen homes, cynical banks and earnest Bankses: That's an awful lot of complications for even a wizardly problem solver like Mary Poppins to unravel.
Peisner does a wizardly job of turning the potentially dull machinations of backstage Hollywood into intriguing details by highlighting the personalities involved and distilling their aspirations and skirmishes down to their essence.
The wizardly fingers of Nicholas Angelich conjure Beethoven's transcendental, fragile fantasy, known as his Piano Concerto No.
Moreover, there is also that wizardly wheel warranting to be incessantly greased with fast depleting natural resources, many of which, including atmosphere, cannot be replenished.
But Warnock has waved his wizardly wand again and Cardiff have hit the ground running.
The magical menu consists of a fantastic selection of wizardly savouries, scones and fancies, washed down with our (specially-brewed for the occasion) butterbeer."
The internet is the greatest mass communication tool ever devised, but we lack meaningful content that we wish to communicate so instead we share popular cat videos; similarly, the author behind the most successful franchise of all time now has the opportunity to create a world full of wizardly lore and magical creatures -- but she lacks meaningful content (i.e.
Koshiro's ultimate goal, however, is not to exalt the wizardly qualities of the Japanese army planners and diplomats.
As identified by makeup blog Self, all of the eye shadows in this wizardly bunch have earth tones and the lip glosses will lusciously coat ladies' lips with syrupy liquid.
Shahid played for the country with immense passion and vigor, but he will be best remembered for his wizardly hockey stick and superbly dribbling skills.
Nor is it clear to what extent, if any, Cervantes's narrator, Sir Eggplant, and the wizardly chronicler imagined by Don Quijote coincide in temporal and spatial terms.
Interestingly, in her review for The Enforcer, Kael contradicts her earlier reviews by praising the original Dirty Harry as "a wizardly piece of vicious, brutal filmmaking" and commending the second one as a "poorly made" film that at least has "some cheap nastiness," which she meant as a compliment.