women-headed households

women-headed households

HOUSEHOLDS headed by women rather than men. The term has been used especially in connection with Third World and peasant economies where the norm is PATRIARCHY. Here the presence of such atypical households is liable to present special problems of poverty and disadvantage (e.g. Kumari, 1989). The sources of women-headed households include widowhood, desertion and divorce, and economic migration of the male partner.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
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The legacy of the 1994 genocide means there are many women-headed households in Rwanda who make their living from small parcels of land.
Data of Labor Force Survey 2018 showed that the percentage of women-headed households in Palestine was 11% (12% in the West Bank and 9% in Gaza Strip).
With regard to women headed households (294 observations) we can see that women-headed households in the beneficiary groups report a significantly higher value of livestock income as well as of livestock herd measured as TLU, which, given the objectives of the project is a positive outcome which complies with expectations from the theory of change.
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More broadly, access to mobile money supported a 20-percent increase in the savings of women-headed households in Kenya.
More broadly, access to mobile money supported a 20 per cent increase in the savings of women-headed households in Kenya.
Women-headed households were more likely to participate in bean marketing than men, as the latter may have more other farm or non-farm opportunities to generate income.
Because of the social environment, women-headed households find it particularly hard to earn an income to provide for their families.
The World Bank has called for the implementation of programmes aimed at improving market accessibility, incentives to promote entrepreneurship among educated youth and schemes to help ex-combatants and women-headed households. As for the estates, multi-sector interventions should be undertaken to improve nutrition outcomes, enhance job opportunities for the youth and prepare for a growing number of aging estate workers, the report has added.

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