wonk

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wonk

An individual who studies a subject in great depth. It often refers to technical disciplines such as computers and science and is thus synonymous with "geek." However, a "policy wonk" is a person who is deeply involved in government programs. See geek.
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And you don't have to be a wonk to want to read on.
For example, one of the latest laughers from the Book of Wonks' rather silly, supercilious and condescending epistles on the Gospel According to Barack Obama, comes from my favorite policy clown, Lord of the Wonks, Ezra Klein.
And so the wonks at Werner scratched their heads a bit and came up with the compact extension ladder.
The racy photograph accompanying Anne Kim's article about the absence of women in Washington think tanks ("Where Are the Women Wonks?," duly/August 2012) was inappropriate.
A Particle Accelerator for economists, fiscal policy wonks and any politician who fancies they know what they're talking about, confined to bash their heads together until Big Bang-theory conditions are attained.
MAPHEAD: CHARTING THE WIDE, WEIRD WORLD OF GEOGRAPHY WONKS reflects the author's passion for geography and the wider world of geography enthusiasts, and is a fine pick for any general-interest collection.
Wonks meet everyday Joes to explain the 2008 global economic crisis in writer-director David Sington's intelligent "The Flaw." Going out of its way to make economic theory and practice digestible (and viewable) to lay audiences, this U.K.-produced doc about a very American problem doesn't introduce new ideas, but manages to consolidate the complex capitalist engine that generated the credit-based crisis that nearly undid the global financial system.
But the Aussie wonks at the Climate Institute, which commissioned the study, expressed surprise that the world's top polluter is also the top force in the drive for clean energy.
Although it comes from a simple abbreviation, SpAd happens to be the perfect adjective for geeky, ambitious, party wonks. Like a compound of "spod", "spanner" and "nerd", one can imagine the Miliband brothers being called SpAds at school.
The left-winger said all the other candidates were "policy wonks" and "men in their 40s who played football together".