wood preservative


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wood preservative

[′wu̇d pri‚zər·vəd·iv]
(materials)
A material used to coat wood to kill insects and fungi, but not usually classed as an insecticide; coal tar creosote and its derivatives are the most widely used wood preservatives.

wood preservative

A chemical used to prevent or retard the decay of wood, esp. by fungi or insects; widely used preservatives include creosote, pitch, sodium fluoride, and tar; esp. used on wood having contact with the ground.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is obvious that the wood sample size, treatment schedule and temperature have high impact on the penetration of wood preservatives and will be the object of further investigation.
More recently, restrictions on the use of creosote and heavy-metal based wood preservatives have focused public and government attention on technological developments in the wood protection area, specifically on the availability of more natural alternatives (Evans 2003, Schultz et al.
The role of particle size of particulate nano-zinc oxide wood preservatives on termite mortality and leach resistance.
In February of this year, the Environmental Protection Agency announced a phase-out of a number of uses of arsenic and chromium-based wood preservative by January 1, 2004.
The EPA has undertaken a reevaluation of penta, creosote and copper chromium arsenate (CCA), the most commonly used wood preservatives.
To examine whether commercially available neem oil could be used as a wood preservative, we dissolved it in white spirit, which is a common solvent for the timber treatment industry.
Most arsenic wood preservatives will be banned in Europe from June.
Pentachlorophenol is used as a fungicide and herbicide, and was widely used as a wood preservative until the 1970s.
A federal jury found that a wood preservative sold to Marvin Windows by PPG Industries did not prevent rot as advertised and ordered PPG to pay $135.
CCA, a chemical compound containing inorganic arsenic, copper, and chromium, has been used as a wood preservative since the 1940s.
After reading the depositions in the case and the discovery obtained from the ladder manufacturer, the only viable trial theory I could discern from the pleadings was that the ladder had not been treated with a wood preservative to prevent its degradation.