wormhole routing


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wormhole routing

(messaging)
A property of a message passing system in which each part of a message is transmitted independently and one part can be forwarded to the next node before the whole message has been received. All parts of a single message follow the same route.

The independent parts are normally small, e.g. one 32-bit word. This reduces the latency and the storage requirements on each node when compared with message switching where a node receives the whole message before it starts to forward it to the next node. It is more complex than message switching because each node must keep track of the messages currently flowing through it.

With cut-through switching, wormhole routing is applied to packets in a packet switching system so that forwarding of a packet starts as soon as its destination is known, before the whole packet had arrived.
References in periodicals archive ?
Source routing for NoC (SRN) and force directed wormhole routing (FDWR) are two examples of fully adaptive routing algorithm [127, 128].
By which they determine the optimal buffer size for switch design, this based on the wormhole routing method.
Wormhole routing has emerged as the most widely used switching technique in massively parallel computers.
Additional Key Words and Phrases: Deadlock avoidance and recovery, directly connected multicomputers, fault-tolerance, network topology, router design, switching techniques, virtual channels, wormhole routing algorithms
Theories have been developed for designing cost-effective, efficient, deadlock-free, and livelock-free wormhole routing algorithms.
A preliminary survey on wormhole routing was given by Ni and McKinley [1993].
The classification of wormhole routing algorithms and deadlock-free routing theory are presented in Section 4.
The methodology and the algorithms developed here can be used to develop routing for other schemes such as wormhole routing, and for other recursively defined networks such as k-ary n-cubes.
However, as we explain later, the algorithms developed here are easily modifiable to work with other switching techniques, including wormhole routing.
Some hypercube routing algorithms have been developed for wormhole routing [Dally and Seitz 1987; Duato 1994; Gravano et al.
A minimum-distance, adaptive wormhole routing algorithm reported by Gravano et al.