wound botulism


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Related to wound botulism: Infant botulism

wound botulism

[‚wünd ′bäch·ə‚liz·əm]
(medicine)
Botulism that involves production of toxin by the organisms infecting or colonizing a wound.
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Symptoms of wound botulism were initially attributed to drug intoxication for four patients.
Of that number, only 16 cases were wound botulism. All documented cases were in injection drug users.
Although rare, wound botulism can also occur in equids (GALEY, 2001; FREY et al., 2007).
Wound botulism in injectors of drugs: upsurge in cases in England during 2004.
First case of type E wound botulism diagnosed using real-time PCR.
Wound botulism is a rare disease and occurs when the endospores get into an open wound and multiply in an anaerobic environment (Figure 3-26).
Wound botulism can be prevented by promptly seeking medical care for infected wounds and by not using injectable street drugs.
Wound botulism in California, 1951-1998: recent epidemic in heroin injectors.
Four days after her admission, wound botulism was suspected and antitoxin administered.
The median age, gender distribution, and fatality rate were similar to those of other foodborne cases, and no patients were reported to be injection drug users, the leading risk factor for wound botulism (21).
During January-November 1995, a total of 19 laboratory-confirmed cases of wound botulism were reported to the California Department of Health Services (CDHS); of these, 13 had occurred since August.
Botulism is reported as two distinct conditions: foodborne botulism and other or unspecified forms of botulism, including wound botulism. All of the study conditions, except tularemia and selected viral encephalitides, were designated as nationally notifiable throughout the study period.