contraction

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Related to wound contraction: wound contracture, secondary intention

contraction,

in physics: see expansionexpansion,
in physics, increase in volume resulting from an increase in temperature. Contraction is the reverse process. When heat is applied to a body, the rate of vibration and the distances between the molecules composing it are increased and, hence, the space occupied by the
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.

contraction,

in writing: see abbreviationabbreviation,
in writing, arbitrary shortening of a word, usually by cutting off letters from the end, as in U.S. and Gen. (General). Contraction serves the same purpose but is understood strictly to be the shortening of a word by cutting out letters in the middle, the omission
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.

contraction

[kən′trak·shən]
(graphic arts)
A microfilm defect in the form of a compressed image that occurs when the film speed is reduced as the document passes through a rotary microfilmer.
(mathematics)
A function f from a metric space to itself for which there is a constant K that is less than 1 such that, for any two elements in the space, a and b, the distance between f (a) and f (b) is less than K times the distance between a and b.
(mechanics)
The action or process of becoming smaller or pressed together, as a gas on cooling.
(physiology)
Shortening of the fibers of muscle tissue.

contraction

Of concrete, the sum of volume changes occurring as the result of all processes affecting the bulk volume of a mass of concrete.

contraction

1. Physiol any normal shortening or tensing of an organ or part, esp of a muscle, e.g. during childbirth
2. Pathol any abnormal tightening or shrinking of an organ or part

contraction

References in periodicals archive ?
The enhanced rate of wound contraction and significant reduction in healing time might be due to enhanced epithelialization.
Furthermore, skin wounds treated with fraction C presented a better healing than wounds treated with fraction D; in fact, they appear to epithelialize faster and the rate of wound contraction is higher as compared to wounds treated with fraction D, where macrophages, fibroblasts and neovasculature in the granulation tissue still coexist 7 days after wounding.
The percentage of wound contraction in untreated and treated groups was measured on 7th, 14th, 21st, 08th post wound day and the results are shown in table 4.
Changes in the wound area were calculated, giving an indication of the rate of wound contraction.
Ehrlich, "The absence of myofibroblasts reported in other studies also show uniform organized granulation tissue collagen fiber bundles that undergo wound contraction at the same rate and are as strong as or stronger than untreated wounds enriched in myofibroblasts.
Application of the photo-cross-linkable chitosan hydrogel on full-thickness skin incisions made on the backs of mice significantly induced wound contraction and accelerated wound closure and healing compared with the untreated controls (24-26).
Never before have the effects of lower negative pressure on regional blood flow, wound contraction, and fluid removal been examined in detail.