wreck

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wreck

1. 
a. the accidental destruction of a ship at sea
b. the ship so destroyed
2. Maritime law goods cast ashore from a wrecked vessel
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
Over the city of the Mercenaries we saw a great captive war- balloon that burst even as we looked at it, and fell in flaming wreckage toward the earth.
The porter caught hold of a piece of the wreckage with which to steady himself.
He groaned as they dragged him out and laid him down upon a cushion in the shelter of the wreckage.
In order to do this weight had to be dropped, and Kurt was detailed with a dozen men to climb down among the wreckage of the deflated air-chambers and cut the stuff clear, portion by portion, as the airship sank.
All together they cleared three considerable chunks of wreckage, and then Bert was glad to clamber up into the cabins again and give place to a second squad.
The moment that the last of the fliers came to rest at the base of the shaft the black-bearded, yellow warriors swarmed over the mass of wreckage upon which they lay, making prisoners of those who were uninjured and occasionally despatching with a sword-thrust one of the wounded who seemed prone to resent their taunts and insults.
When the turbulent waters had somewhat subsided and the sea had ceased to spew up wreckage, I ventured to swim back in search of something substantial enough to support my weight and that of Nobs as well.
The sea was littered with wreckage among which floated the pitiful forms of women and children, buoyed up by their useless lifebelts.
The first was a mass of wreckage floating beside the derelict in the midst of which, bottom up, rose and fell an overturned lifeboat; the other was the faint, dim line of a far-distant shore showing on the horizon in the east.
The wreckage of the spring washing appeared everywhere--piles of sluice-boxes, sections of elevated flumes, huge water-wheels,--all the debris of an army of gold-mad men.
There was a rush of sailors across the wreckage of the fore- topmast to the forecastle to pack their bags.
"Clear that raffle," I answered, pointing to the tangled wreckage overside.