wrong

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wrong

1. (of a side, esp of a fabric) intended to face the inside so as not to be seen
2. Law
a. an infringement of another person's rights, rendering the offender liable to a civil action, as for breach of contract or tort
b. a violation of public rights and duties, affecting the community as a whole and actionable at the instance of the Crown
References in classic literature ?
Thou doest wrong In this, and wrong in all that thou hast done.
To us it is incomprehensible that millions of Christian men killed and tortured each other either because Napoleon was ambitious or Alexander was firm, or because England's policy was astute or the Duke of Oldenburg wronged. We cannot grasp what connection such circumstances have with the actual fact of slaughter and violence: why because the Duke was wronged, thousands of men from the other side of Europe killed and ruined the people of Smolensk and Moscow and were killed by them.
"It may be psychologically possible," answered Flambeau, "and it certainly would explain Dreyfus being certain he was wronged and his judges being sure he was guilty.
I hate to have him do so, and tried to stop it, but went to work the wrong way, so we got into a mess."
'Even if my own wrong had prevailed with me, and my own vengeance had moved me, could I have found no justification?
SOCRATES: Are we to say that we are never intentionally to do wrong, or that in one way we ought and in another way we ought not to do wrong, or is doing wrong always evil and dishonorable, as I was just now saying, and as has been already acknowledged by us?
I am in search of a man who has done me the cruelest wrong that one human creature can inflict on another.
When things went wrong, or I heard things, I used to think it was her fault, but, looking back, it's more mine.
Darkness full of thunder followed, and after the thunder Father Brown's voice said out of the dark: "Doctor, this paper is the wrong shape."
I was too hard with my father, for doing wrong. I've been a bit hard t' everybody but her.
I returned with the articles in time to hear the Cockney hinting broadly that there was a mystery about him, that he might be a gentleman's son gone wrong or something or other; also, that he was a remittance man and was paid to keep away from England--"p'yed
Square had no sooner lighted his pipe, than, addressing himself to Allworthy, he thus began: "Sir, I cannot help congratulating you on your nephew; who, at an age when few lads have any ideas but of sensible objects, is arrived at a capacity of distinguishing right from wrong. To confine anything, seems to me against the law of nature, by which everything hath a right to liberty.