Xeroradiography


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

xeroradiography

[¦zi·rō‚rād·ē′äg·rə·fē]
(graphic arts)
An electrostatic image-forming process in which x-rays or gamma rays form an electrostatic image on a photoconductive insulating medium; the charged image areas attract and hold a fine powder called a toner, and then the powder image is transferred to paper and fused there by heat.

Xeroradiography

 

a method of obtaining X-ray images using semiconductor photographic plates, with the image appearing on ordinary paper rather than on X-ray film.

Developed by the American physicist C. Carlsson in 1938, xeroradiography came into use in the 1960’s as a nondestructive means of checking the parts used in machine building, uranium samples, and the like. It is also used in medicine to diagnose diseases of the bones and milk ducts. It was used for the first time in the USSR in 1964–65 to diagnose diseases of the internal organs and urinary tract. Several new methods of examination originated from it, for example, electroroentgenangiography and roentgenoscanning.

In xeroradiography the exposure (on selenium plates) is done using an X-ray machine, and the latent electrostatic image is developed by dusting with colored powder. The image is transferred from the plate to a sheet of paper and fixed in a special xeroradiographic device. The diagnostic capability of xeroradiography, the speed and convenience in obtaining the photograph (no need for a photographic laboratory or a source of water supply), and its cost effectiveness have made it a promising method of modern X-ray diagnosis, chiefly in traumatology and emergency diagnosis.

REFERENCE

Paleev, N. R., I. Kh. Rabkin, and V. I. Borodulin, Vvedenie v klinicheskuiu elektrorentgenografiiu. Moscow, 1971.

N. R. PALEEV

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
History and recent developments in xeroradiography of the breast.
Xeroradiophotography mechanism is similar to Xeroradiography, but in this system for the patient\'s dose reduction, a photo-intensifier screen is used.
Therefore, ultrasound can be limited in the detection of free silicone in the posterior aspect of a large volume implant in a large breast.[67] Because conventional mammographic views also are inadequate at imaging the posterior aspect of the implant, CT, MRI, supplemental mammographic views or xeroradiography may be required.[83,84]
[20.] Diehl R, Gratt BM, Gould RG: Radiographic quality control measurements comparing D-speed film, E-speed film, and xeroradiography. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol 1986;61:635-640.