yawing


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yawing

[′yȯ·iŋ]
(mechanics)
yaw
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

yaw

yaw
Rotated coordinate system superimposed on photo print.
i. The rotation of an aircraft or a missile about its vertical axis so as to cause its longitudinal axis to deviate from the flight line or heading in its horizontal plane. Also known as yawing.
ii. To rotate or oscillate about a vertical axis.
iii. The rotation of a camera or a photograph coordinate system about either the photograph's z-axis or the exterior's z-axis.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Raising the nose to lift off and climb away from the runway also creates a gyroscopic effect potentially yawing the nose even more.
One elite female breaststroke swimmer (height: 1.78 m; weight: 69.8kg) who competes internationally in 50 m and 100m events was selected for in-depth analysis due to the presence of a consistent pattern of yawing motions.
It is also quite possible for any bullet, no matter its contour, construction, or velocity to at some point during its flight exhibit some type of yawing motion.
This happens even before the driver is aware of the yawing movement, which would normally lead to a worsening situation, and possible loss of control.
In the diagram above, the airplane is yawing to its right.
That drag, in turn, creates yawing moments that some aileron designs are engineered to minimize.
With the slip-skid ball far to the right, an accelerated stall occurred while yawing left.
This results in the aircraft yawing toward the wing which had experienced an increase in lift (and drag).