yaws


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yaws

or

frambesia,

tropical infection of the skin caused by a spirochete (Treponema pertenue) closely related to that causing syphilissyphilis
, contagious sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum (described by Fritz Schaudinn and Erich Hoffmann in 1905). Syphilis was not widely recognized until an epidemic in Europe at the end of the 15th cent.
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. Yaws, however, is not a sexually transmitted diseasesexually transmitted disease
(STD) or venereal disease,
term for infections acquired mainly through sexual contact. Five diseases were traditionally known as venereal diseases: gonorrhea, syphilis, and the less common granuloma inguinale, lymphogranuloma venereum, and
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, i.e., it is not contracted by sexual contact; transmission is through ordinary contact with infected persons or their clothing and by insects. An ulcerating lesion ("mother yaw") appears at the site of contact. The second stage of the disease begins 6 to 12 weeks later, when similar ulcerating lesions appear all over the body. If the disease is not treated, the third stage develops several years later, nodular and ulcerating lesions affecting the soles of the feet ("crab yaws") and penetrating the bones with destructive changes. The first and second stages of yaws are easily treated with penicillin and other antibiotics. Yaws is rarely fatal; however, it can lead to chronic disfigurement and disability.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Yaws

 

a chronic and infectious spirochetal skin disease. It is common in almost all the tropical countries of North and South America, Africa, Asia, and Oceania, usually affecting the native rural population. The disease is caused by the spirochete Treponema pertenue. Infection usually occurs by contact through injured skin and is fostered by unsanitary living conditions. The symptoms of yaws are granulomatous swellings (resembling raspberries) and ulcerations of the skin; lesions of the bones, accompanied by severe pain, are not infrequent. Yaws is treated with arsenic and bismuth preparations and with antibiotics. Prophylaxis entails observance of the rules of hygiene and improvement of sanitary conditions.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

yaws

[′yȯz]
(medicine)
An infectious tropical disease of humans caused by the spirochete Treponema pertenue; manifested by a primary cutaneous lesion followed by a granulomatous skin eruption.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

yaws

an infectious nonvenereal disease of tropical climates with early symptoms resembling syphilis, characterized by red skin eruptions and, later, pain in the joints: it is caused by the spiral bacterium Treponema pertenue
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Yaw rate is also associated with lateral acceleration: [psi] = (transverse acceleration) / (vehicle velocity).
The seropositive samples from South Sulawesi and West Sulawesi Provinces were collected in July and August of 2000, immediately pre-dating an active yaws outbreak among humans in the region that caused 241 documented cases in the neighboring southeastern peninsula during 2001-2011 (WHO, http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/75528/1/ WHO_HTM_NTD_IDM_2012.2_eng.pdf) (Figure).
An abrupt right steer followed by progressively straightening the steering wheel was used to generate vehicle yaw. Table 3 depicts the steering inputs, which were used in all simulations.
Health workers physically examined all children and tallied those with lesions under Yaws if yaws was suspected or under Other ulcers/lesions in the tally sheet.
Yaws originated in the Old World, before evolving and spreading with humans to the Middle East and Eastern Europe as endemic syphilis, and then to the Americas as yaws, the team proposes.
Heathcote's (1991) report on the Gognga-Gun Beach human remains is, in fact, mute on the history of yaws in Guam...
A recent review of important research questions facing the global yaws eradication program has highlighted the need for more accurate data to inform the optimum number and coverage of rounds of TCT and TTT that will be required to achieve yaws eradication (10).
In a real-world environment, a vehicle on the road is subjected to a range of flow yaw angles, the most severe of which can impact handling and stability.
We recorded location, classification, and duration of skin lesions and yaws treatment history using the LINKS system (7, http://www.linkssystem.org/).
By contrast, compelling evidence suggests that yaws exists in wild nonhuman primate populations residing in regions where humans are also infected (Figure).
If one spends much time listening to the old-timers populating FBO pilot lounges, today's pilots don't know how to use the rudder to manage yaw, especially when flying an older airplane or one with a tailwheel.