yellow mud

yellow mud

[′yel·ō ′məd]
(geology)
Mud containing sediment having a characteristic yellow color, resulting from certain iron compounds.
References in classic literature ?
His cultivation enables him--and me, now--to see water in that glaring yellow mud, and natural effects in those lurid explosions of mixed smoke and flame, and crimson sunset glories; it reconciles him--and me, now--to the floating of iron cable-chains and other unfloatable things; it reconciles us to fishes swimming around on top of the mud--I mean the water.
The house fronts looked black enough, and the windows blacker, contrasting with the smooth white sheet of snow upon the roofs, and with the dirtier snow upon the ground; which last deposit had been ploughed up in deep furrows by the heavy wheels of carts and waggons; furrows that crossed and recrossed each other hundreds of times where the great streets branched off; and made intricate channels, hard to trace in the thick yellow mud and icy water.
yellow mud, greasy ponds, dirty clothes and heaps of mangled sandbags.
Setting off to find out more about China's roots, he heads to the plain of Yellow River, where he joins a million pilgrims at the shrine of ancient Goddess Nuwa, who legend says, made the first people from the yellow mud of the Yellow River.
Setting off on a mission to find out more about China's roots, he heads to the plain of Yellow River, where he joins a million pilgrims the shrine of ancient Goddess Nuwa who, legend says, made the first people from the yellow mud of the famous waterway.
Setting off on a mission to find out more about China's roots, he heads to the plain of Yellow River, where he joins a million pilgrims at the shrine of ancient Goddess Nuwa who, legend has it, made the first people from the yellow mud of the famous waterway.
To answer that question Michael journeys to the plain of the Yellow River, where he joins a million pilgrims at the shrine of ancient Goddess Nuwa, who legend says, made the first people from its yellow mud.
From the ancient city we head to the Sugong Tower, which is the tallest minaret in China and like everything else in this region is made of sun- dried yellow mud bricks.
The solution is made using a local peeli mithi or yellow mud which is similar to fueller's earth.
Gone is the town she described as: "A town of stately yellow mud buildings, surrounded by high city walls and giving the impression of a medieval city", now replaced by some of the tallest buildings in the world.
Sadie sets out to find it and is dismayed to discover the lake has dried up to a scum of yellow mud dotted with ruins of old buildings and rotted trees from the time before the valley was drowned.