yeoman


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yeoman

(yō`mən), class in English society. The term has always been ill-defined, but generally it means a freeholder of a lower status than gentleman who cultivates his own land. With the breakdown of medieval systems of tenure the numbers of this class increased and formed the basis for a rural middle class. Certain retainers of a fairly high rank in noble households were also called yeomen, and thus the name was given to specific branches of the royal household, e.g., Yeomen of the Horse or Yeomen of the GuardYeomen of the Guard,
bodyguard, now ceremonial in function, of the sovereign of England. When the guard was originated by Henry VII in 1485, its members had numerous duties as defenders of the king's person and household functionaries.
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. The yeoman foot soldiers of the Hundred Years War were the troops most personally in the service of the king. The more modern military use of the term dates from the 18th cent., when voluntary cavalry units called the yeomanry were used to suppress riots. From 1794 they were organized into regiments. Their service in the South African War (1899–1902) earned them the name Imperial Yeomanry, and in 1907 they became a part of the Territorial Army.

yeoman

1. History
a. a member of a class of small freeholders of common birth who cultivated their own land
b. an assistant or other subordinate to an official, such as a sheriff, or to a craftsman or trader
c. an attendant or lesser official in a royal or noble household
2. (in Britain) another name for yeoman of the guard
References in periodicals archive ?
Yeoman and his staff had noticed that while running the dive, the motioning wingback often missed blocking the defensive end--allowing the DE to come crashing down on the dive.
The Tower of London and its rituals such as the Ceremony of the Keys were established as tourist attractions at an early date and the Yeoman Warders became proud of their role in guarding the nation's heritage.
The Yeoman Warders came into being when Henry VIII stopped living at the Tower.
An organisation looking to encourage'the growth of best practice in the lettings industry throughout South Wales' threw out Yeoman Edwards on March 14, 2006.
The hearing was told that before the tests Ms Yeoman had attended a teaching seminar where "everybody at her table had been talking about the fact they had opened their papers and shared them with staff".
A spokesman for the Tower of London said: "We can confirm three yeoman warders are under investigation in response to allegations of harassment.
Her son Kevin Yeoman, from Pickering, said the previous day his mother had been in "good spirits".
Mrs Yeoman, a housewife, said: "She's going back to school for the last week of term and wants to return to trampolining.
However, further interference at the fourth-last obstacle proved costly and Chief Yeoman began to struggle before coming down at the next fence.
McCoy booted Buena Vista a couple of lengths clear on the turn, but Chief Yeoman appeared to be going the better and was trading as the favourite on Betfair.
The unnamed woman applied for the job even though Yeoman Warders have been exclusively male since the squad was launched in 1485 by Henry VII as a group of private bodyguards.