yerba santa


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yerba santa

yerba santa

Shrub with thin pointy lance-shaped leaves. Smaller branches and leaves are coated with sticky resin that sometimes has black fungus on it (don”t use that part). Bell-shaped purple-white flowers. Smells and tastes bad. Leaf tea used for upper respiratory conditions, asthma, expectorant, cough, congestion, dilates bronchial tubes
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking about it, Maher said, "This is a compound that was known but ignored," adding, "Not only did sterubin turn out to be much more active than the other flavonoids in Yerba santa in our assays, it appears as good as, if not better than, other flavonoids we have studied."
The Lompoc yerba santa, a shrub in the waterleaf family (Hydrophyllaceae), produces lavender flowers on sticky stems that can reach heights of 10 feet (3 meters).
Four Central California Plants A separate March 20 rule listed four plant species native to the south-central coast region of California as endangered: the Lompoc yerba santa (Eriodictyon capitatum), a shrub in the waterleaf family (Hydrophyllaceae); La Graciosa thistle (Cirsium loncholepis), a short-lived plant in the sunflower family (Asteraceae); Gaviota tarplant (Hemizonia increscens var.
Yerba Santa (Eriodiction califormicum): The leaves of this western shrub help liquify mucous in the lungs, facilitate expectoration, and prevent infection.
* Lompoc yerba santa (Eriodictyon capitatum)--a lavender-flowered shrub in the waterleaf family (Hydrophyllaceae) that can grow up to 10 feet (3 m) tall.