yield factor

yield factor

[′yēld ‚fak·tər]
(industrial engineering)
The ratio of the amount of material that results from an industrial process to the amount of material that went into it.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Microorganism chosen for production of lactic acid should have high yield factor along with low cell mass at the expense of low cost raw material in low pH and at high temperature, along with negligible byproducts [21].
The ethanol yield factor ([Y.sub.P/S]), ethanol productivity ([Q.sub.P]), and cell yield factor ([Y.sub.X/S]) were taken as responses of the experimental design.
To evaluate the performance parameters of solar PV plant such as energy efficiency, yield factor, performance ratio, and capacity factor are defined by IEC 61724:1998 Standard and International Energy Agency (IEA) [9, 16, 23-32].
In other words, the graphs depict the effect of a one-time shock to liquidity on the current and future value of the particular span yield factor. Dashed lines represent bootstrap 95% confidence bands derived via 1,000 bootstrap simulations.
The ecological footprint methodology uses a common measurement unit to express ecological footprint and EC in terms of a bioproductive area with the global average productivity, introducing the "equivalence factor" and "yield factor." The equivalence factor represents the world average potential productivity of a given bioproductive area relative to the world average potential productivity of all bioproductive areas.
Therefore, this factor may be called cane yield factor.
The yield factor has not been applied to the tonnage quoted above because not all material would require screening.
THE PRESENT CONSUMER audience of parents and students intent on enrolling in a college of their choice has become increasingly savvy about the strategic efforts on the part of admissions committees to select applicants, in no small measure, with the yield factor in mind.
Kan, 1996, "A Yield Factor Model of Interest Rates", Mathematical Finance, 6:379-406
At a 50% yield factor, for example, 30 tons of castings shipped will generate 30 tons of return metal that must be transported back to the melt department.