yield factor

yield factor

[′yēld ‚fak·tər]
(industrial engineering)
The ratio of the amount of material that results from an industrial process to the amount of material that went into it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, this factor may be called cane yield factor.
The yield factor has not been applied to the tonnage quoted above because not all material would require screening.
THE PRESENT CONSUMER audience of parents and students intent on enrolling in a college of their choice has become increasingly savvy about the strategic efforts on the part of admissions committees to select applicants, in no small measure, with the yield factor in mind.
Kan, 1996, "A Yield Factor Model of Interest Rates", Mathematical Finance, 6:379-406
At a 50% yield factor, for example, 30 tons of castings shipped will generate 30 tons of return metal that must be transported back to the melt department.
By Hotelling's Lemma the derivatives of the GNP function with respect to prices yield the profit maximizing levels of output, and with respect to factors yield factor prices in a competitive equilibrium.
A useful concept to aid sensitivity analysis, circuit variable tolerancing and design centering is the yield factor (YF) associated with the value of each circuit variable.
A discussion on the appropriate yield factor is beyond the scope of this article, but suffice it to say that as a rule, if an inflation factor is applied to the cash flows, the yield rate should not be less than the cap rate plus the inflation rate applied.
The software does not calculate scrap or shrinkage at the component level, but does provides a yield factor at the assembly level.
The modern freezer must be built to be reliable, energy efficient, hygienic by design, able to produce even, consistent temperatures and a high yield factor.