yogurt


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

yogurt:

see fermented milkfermented milk,
whole or skim milk curdled to beverage or custardlike consistency by lactic-acid-producing microorganisms. Many forms of fermented milk were used by early nomadic herders, especially in Asia and S and E Europe, Scandinavia, Africa, and South America.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

yogurt

[′yō·gərt]
(food engineering)
A fermented milk food made by adding cultures of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Streptococcus thermophilus to skimmed cow's milk and milk solids.
References in periodicals archive ?
The survey, which was completed by more than 6,200 consumers in USA, China, Brazil, Turkey, France and Poland, showed that around the world an increased focus on a healthy lifestyle is the major driving force behind the rise in yogurt sales.
However, eating low fat yogurt did not appear to have any impact on the isk of obesity.
Sorry to say, it's no yogurt to me," says Galanakis, who eats yogurt as part of his daily nutrition.
In its recent research, Mintel pegged retail sales of yogurt, including yogurt drinks and frozen products, at nearly $6.
She served herself a cupful of yogurt at Smyles Frozen Yogurt in Hudson, and helped her two children with their portions of orange-vanilla flavored yogurt.
At the same time that it introduced the frozen yogurt in January, Cold Stone also launched the Cold Stone Creamery Yogurt Bar in selected markets around the country including in Scottsdale, AZ; Dublin and Orange, CA.
Those are the two strains of bacteria that companies add to milk to make yogurt.
In experiments, the scientists used Fantesk at different levels (up to 4%) to replace the milk solids content (up to 40%) when preparing different yogurt samples.
Moreover, frozen yogurt generally hasn't been doing well lately--US production slumped 43% to 303.
Of course, bacteria isn't the only thing that makes yogurt a great snack or breakfast choice.