youngster


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youngster

a young animal, esp a horse
References in classic literature ?
The youngster leaned back and snuggled up to Jurgis, murmuring contentedly; in half a minute he was sound asleep, Jurgis sat shivering, speculating as to whether he might not still be able to get hold of the roll of bills.
So the cheerful youngster rattled on, until he was tired out.
They agreed that the happiest time in their lives was as youngsters in good ships, with no care in the world but not to lose a watch below when at sea and not a moment's time in going ashore after work hours when in harbour.
You youngsters don't seem to mind whom you get into trouble.
But I doubt, sir, that them youngsters ever played as clever games as is being played aboard us right now.
Send a gang of youngsters to the Gate, and tell them to narrow it in with a couple of stout scrap-wax pillars.
The youngsters told off to the pillars had refused to chew scrap-wax because it made their jaws ache, and were clamouring for virgin stuff.
I noticed that all the youngsters shrank away from him as we had done, while the grown-ups regarded him with wary eyes when he drew near, and stepped aside to give him the centre of the path.
And the two simple-minded youngsters at the sculls feel quite proud of being allowed to row such wonderful oarsmen as Jack and Tom, and strain away harder than ever.
It's very little kindness for the sixth to meddle generally--you youngsters mind that.
Yes, they are splendid, splendid youngsters," chimed in the count, who always solved questions that seemed to him perplexing by deciding that everything was splendid.
As we shall not see her again, it may be worth mentioning here that all Never birds now build in that shape of nest, with a broad brim on which the youngsters take an airing.