zonal theory

zonal theory

[′zōn·əl ′thē·ə·rē]
(geology)
A theory of the formation of mineral deposition and sequence patterns, based on the changes in a mineral-bearing fluid as it passes upward from a magmatic source.
References in periodicals archive ?
Balakrishnan and Jarvis test the applicability of Burgess's concentric zonal theory of spatial differentials in urban Canada.
In the early Middle Ages, Isidore and Bede, who reproduced the zonal theory of a southern, habitable belt, nevertheless both classed inhabitants of the antipodes as creations of fable.
Maps which belong to the classical tradition, such as those accompanying Macrobius's Commentary, illustrate the zonal theory which envisages an inhabitable southern band corresponding to the known world in the northern hemisphere.