zooid

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Related to zooids: phylum Bryozoa, siphonophore

zooid

1. any independent animal body, such as an individual of a coelenterate colony
2. a motile cell or body, such as a gamete, produced by an organism
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

zooid

[′zō‚ȯid]
(invertebrate zoology)
A more or less independent individual of colonial animals such as bryozoans and coral.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
On ablation of the zooids, the remaining vascular tissue initially loses a small volume of hemolymph but quickly contracts its peripheral vessels to halt the oozing, and hemocytes start to aggregate (Fig.
En Santa Fe se marcaron tres colonias y cada cuatro horas durante 24 horas, se recolectaron cinco zooides de forma aleatoria de cada colonia.
Comparison of the two genera shows an increase in larval size at hatching, a decrease in the number of eggs per zooid, and an increase in development time between Botryllus and Botrylloides species.
Colonies also vary in total sperm production because they vary in size (number of zooids), which in turn varies during colony ontogeny.
Colonies include three blastogenetic generations represented by mature, filter-feeding zooids, primary buds on zooids, and secondary buds (budlets) emerging from the primary buds (Manni et al., 2007).
To examine the repeatability of sampling only the five longest spines from each colony, spine length was measured for 10 haphazardly chosen zooids in each of four regions of the colony.
In both treatments, [approximately equal to] 85% of the Bugula larvae used in these assays developed two zooids within 24 h, and a paired t test indicated no difference in the number of individuals reaching this stage after 24 h (P = 0.66, N = 18, Fig.
The oldest class, Stenolaemata, has only one extant order: the marine calcified Cyclostomatida with characteristic tube-shaped zooids forming colonies that vary from encrusting to branched to massive.
Jackson and McKinney (1990) found that, in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, communication among zooids was more extensive in cheilostomes than in cyclostomes and that cheilostomes largely replace cyclostomes, which implies a trend in mean degree of individuation for bryozoans as a whole.
Other studies have confirmed higher concentrations of bryostatins on larvae (~10 X), as well as in zooids with ovicells (~3 X) compared to zooids with no ovicells (Lopanik et al., 2004, 2006).